Sara R. Zwart, Ph.D.

 

Senior Scientist

sara.zwart-1@nasa.gov
281-244-2009

 

Sara R. Zwart earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Biological Sciences from the University of Notre Dame in 1999, and her doctorate in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Florida in 2003. She joined the Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center in 2003 as a National Research Council Post-doctoral Fellow, and then began as Research Scientist in the laboratory in 2005. She is now Senior Scientist and Deputy Manager for Nutritional Biochemistry.

As a member of the Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratory, she has been involved with research investigating relationships between nutrition and physiological effects of spaceflight, including bone and muscle loss, changes in iron metabolism, and oxidative damage. The Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratory is charged with defining the nutritional requirements for extended-duration spaceflight. Operational and research activities are being conducted to define the impact of spaceflight on human physiology and nutritional requirements.  

Spaceflight studies include nutritional assessments during long-duration spaceflight and dietary modification to mitigate bone loss associated with spaceflight. Ground-based research is used to understand the role of nutrition in ground-analog studies which simulate varied aspects of space travel.  These include rotating cell culture models, NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) undersea missions, extravehicular activity analogs at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center, bed rest, and Antarctic winter. Published vitamin D studies conducted by the lab were featured in the 2011 Institute of Medicine DRI report to define vitamin D dietary recommendations for North America.

Publications

Bone metabolism and renal stone risk during International Space Station missions


Magnesium and Space Flight


Bone metabolism and renal stone risk during International Space Station missions


Genotype, B-vitamin status, and androgens affect spaceflight-induced ophthalmic changes


Space Environmental Factor Impacts upon Murine Colon Microbiota and Mucosal Homeostasis


Evidence Report: Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition


Body mass changes during long-duration spaceflight


Body mass changes during long-duration spaceflight: response


Smith SM, Zwart SR, Heer M. Book. Human Adaptation to Spaceflight: The Role of Nutrition. NASA; 2014


Sex-specific responses of bone metabolism and renal stone risk during bed rest


Plasma Cytokine Concentrations Indicate That In Vivo Hormonal Regulation of Immunity Is Altered During Long-Duration Spaceflight


Calcium kinetics during bed rest with artificial gravity and exercise countermeasures


Calcium kinetics during bed rest with artificial gravity and exercise countermeasures


Fifty years of human space travel: implications for bone and calcium research


Lane HW, Zwart SR, Kloeris V, Smith SM. (2013). Ch. 25: Food and nutrition for space flight. In: Berdanier CD, Dwyer JT, and Heber D, eds. Handbook of Nutrition and Food. 3rd ed.  New York: CRC Press. Print ISBN: 978-1-4665-0571-1; eBook ISBN: 978-1-4665-0572-8 pp: 381-402, 2013


Men and Women in Space: Bone Loss and Kidney Stone Risk after Long-Duration Spaceflight


Increased dietary iron and radiation in rats promote oxidative stress, induce localized and systemic immune system responses, and alter colon mucosal environment


Smith SM, Zwart SR, Huntoon CL. Endocrinology (Chapter 4.8). (2013) In: Biomedical Results of the Space Shuttle Program, Risin D, Stepaniak P (eds.), Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, NASA/SP-2013-607. ISBN: 978-0-615-86613-0, pp. 157-170


Zwart SR, Smith SM. Chapter 5.1. Nutrition. (2013) In: Biomedical Results of the Space Shuttle Program, Risin D, Stepaniak P (eds.), Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, NASA/SP-2013-607. ISBN: 978-0-615-86613-0, pp. 267-74


Iron status and its relations with oxidative damage and bone loss during long-duration space flight on the International Space Station


Bichemical Profile


Effects of Dietary Iron and Gamma Radiation on the Rat Retina]


Immune System Dysregulation Persists During Long-Duration Spaceflight


A 250 μg/week dose of vitamin D was as effective as a 50 μg/d dose in healthy adults, but a regimen of four weekly followed by monthly doses of 1250 μg raised the risk of hypercalciuria


Space flight calcium: implications for astronaut health, spacecraft operations, and Earth


Co-Authored "Space Nutrition," an iBook (available as a free download on an iPad) for upper elementary school kids about the topic of Space Nutrition. 


High Dietary Iron and Radiation Exposure Increase Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Blood and Liver of Rats


High dietary iron and 137Cs radiation exposure induce oxidative stress and reduce bone mass


High Protein Intake Improves Insulin Sensitivity but Exacerbates Bone Resorption in Immobility (WISE Study)


Plasma Cytokine Levels During Long-Duration Spaceflight


Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function


Vision Changes after Space Flight Are Related to Alterations in Folate-Dependent One-Carbon Metabolism


Assessment of Nutritional Intake During Space Flight and Space Flight Analogs


Urinary Acid Excretion Can Predict Changes in Bone Metabolism During Space Flight


Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function


Plasma Cytokine Levels During Long-Duration Spaceflight


Bone Metabolism and Nutritional Status during 30-day Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest


Benefits for bone from resistance exercise and nutrition in long-duration spaceflight: Evidence from biochemistry and densitometry


Saturation diving alters folate status and biomarkers of DNA damage and repair


Response to vitamin D supplementation during Antarctic winter is related to BMI, and supplementation can mitigate Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation


Capacity of omega-3 fatty acids or eicosapentaenoic acid to counteract weightlessness-induced bone loss by inhibiting NF-kappaB activation: from cells to bed rest to astronauts


Response to vitamin D intake: from the Antarctic to the Institute of Medicine


Vitamin K status in spaceflight and ground-based models of spaceflight


Thyroid status of Space Shuttle crewmembers: effects of iodine removal


Long-Duration Space Flight and Bed Rest Effects on Testosterone and Other Steroids


Vision changes after spaceflight are related to alterations in folate- and vitamin B12-dependent one-carbon metabolism


Vitamin D: From the Antarctic to the International Space Station to North America, Biennial Research and Technology Report


Nutritional countermeasures to space-flight related stress. In: A Chouker (ed.)Stress challenges and immunity in space: from mechanisms to monitoring and protective strategies


Saturation diving alters folate status and biomarkers of DNA damage and repair

Date Updated
2013.07.23